Hooker Surname Meaning, History & Origin

Select Hooker Meaning
The Hooker surname
seems to have derived from the Old English word hocere,
an occupational name for a maker of hooks. This
was a skilled occupation in olden
times. They were not made as today from
iron or steel, but were fashioned using heating and steaming from
animal
bone.
Others have suggested that Hooker,
like Hook or Hooke, might be topographical, describing someone who
lived near a
headland or a spur or bend in a river.

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Hooker Resources on
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Hooker Ancestry

England.
The surname may have
had its origins in East Anglia. Osmundus
Hocere was recorded in Ely, Cambridgeshire as early as 975. The spelling became Hoker and then
Hooker. The first prominent family of
that name, however, was to be found in Devon in SW England.

Devon.
The Devon Hooker family was originally Hooker alias Vowell. Vowell
was the male line from south Wales; Hooker the family name (probably
from
Cambridgeshire) of the female heiress who had married into the family
in the
1450’s.

Descendants here included:

  • John Hooker, the first Chamberlain of Exeter
    and a historian of the town.
  • John’s
    nephew Richard Hooker, known as “the Judicious,” an influential
    Protestant
    theologian of the late 1500’s. His
    statue is to be found outside Exeter Cathedral.
  • John’s son the Rev. Zachary Hooker of Caerhayes in
    Cornwall and the line
    from his son Valentine in Crediton, Devon. There
    were later Nonconformist Hooker ministers at Crediton
    and at
    Chumleigh.
  • and Joseph Hooker who
    migrated from Exeter in the 1770’s and set himself up as a wool-stapler
    in
    Norwich. From his line came the famous
    father-and-son botanist family of Kew, William Jackson Hooker and Joseph Dalton Hooker.

Elsewhere. Hookers
date from about 1500 in
Leicestershire. Thomas Hooker was a farm manager on the Digby estate
in the
mid-1500’s. He evidently was a man of
some substance as his will of 1559 reveals.
His grandson Thomas, born in Tilton parish in 1586, was a
Puritan
preacher of considerable renown.
Persecuted by Archbishop William Laud for non-conformity, he
departed
England first to Holland and then on the Griffin
to New England in 1633.

William Hooker
was first sighted at Berkhamstead in Hertfordshire in 1622. His
son Sir
William Hooker
prospered as a grocer in London and was its
mayor in
1673. He lived in some splendor in
Greenwich.

His coat of arms was the same
as that borne by the Hookers who acquired Broad Oak at Brenchley in
Kent in
1698, although they probably had different antecedents.
The Brenchley forebear here may instead have been Thomas Hooker, born
around 1620 at Oldberry Hill near Sevenoaks. Hookers were
to remain in residence
at Brenchley during the 18th and 19th centuries.

“Samuel Hooker was well known at Broad Oak
for his country roses. In 1848 he
produced a new gladiolus species which he named
Gladiolus x Brenchleyensis.”


The architect John Marshall Hooker was born at
Brenchley in 1829.

John Hooker, related to this family, was the owner of Tonbridge Castle in Kent in the 1730’s.His son Thomas lost the family fortune sometime in the
1780’s when their gunpowder mill blew up. His grandson Thomas
then became the vicar at Rottingdean in Sussex, holding that position
from 1792 until his death in 1838.
During that time he supplemented his income by acting as
the lookout man for the smugglers who used Rottingdean as their base.

America. The Rev. Thomas Hooker, who
arrived in 1633, was a towering figure in the early development of
colonial New
England. Known today as “the father of
Connecticut,” he had founded the colony at Hartford after dissenting
with the
Puritan leaders in Massachusetts.

His
descendant line, via his son the Rev. Samuel Hooker the minister at
Farmington,
is large and was covered in Edward Hooker’s 1908 book The
Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hooker
. Samuel and his wife Mary raised ten sons and two
daughters.

Some of their descendants
based themselves in Hartford, as merchants in the firm of Hooker &
Chaffee. This company provided supplies
to the American forces during the Revolutionary War.
Captain James Hooker fought in that war and
it is his house, built around 1772, that is still standing in Hartford. His line led later to Union General Joseph
Hooker, nicknamed “Fighting Joe,” during the Civil War.

Other lines from Samuel:

  • via his son Nathaniel led to three Hooker
    brothers – Horace, James, and Henry – who settled in Rochester, New
    York in the
    1820’s.
  • via his youngest son Henry led to
    Samuel Hooker, a carpenter, who migrated from Massachusetts to Albany,
    New York
    in 1772. His son Philip became a prominent
    Albany architect.

Another Samuel
descendant was Seth Hooker who moved to New Hampshire in the 1780’s,
settling
in Hinsdale. Two of his descendants
headed west to California in the 1860’s:

  • Henry Clay Hooker,
    born in
    1828, who migrated to Arizona territory
    where he established the Sierra Bonita Ranch in
    1872. It became one of the largest
    ranches in Arizona and was held by family members for several
    generations.
  • and
    John Daggett Hooker, born ten years later, who settled in Los Angeles
    in
    1878. There he initiated the building of
    the
    100-inch Hooker Telescope
    , completed in 1917, one of the most famous
    astronomical telescopes of the 20th century.

Ira
Allen Hooker and his family had come west earlier, leaving Missouri by
wagon
train on the Oregon Trail in 1848 and settling in what was to become
Polk
county, Oregon. Ira was a descendant of
Matthew Hooker who had arrived in Massachusetts as a young boy in the
1640’s. Ira, born in Vermont, had lived
in New York and southern Illinois before heading west.




Hookers in the South
. William Hooker
was in Virginia by the 1680’s
and died in Chowan county, North Carolina in 1717.
Later Hookers of this family migrated to
Tennessee. The sons of Thomas and Sarah
Hooker in Tennessee all ended up in Texas:

  • James
    Hooker, born in 1807, set off by covered wagon for Missouri in 1833
    and later made his home in what was to become Hunt county, Texas. There he founded Hooker’s Community on
    Hooker’s Ridge and built the area’s first steam mill.
    He became a judge and state legislator.
  • Thomas
    Hooker
    , born in 1821, migrated as a young man to Mississippi
    where he
    became a Baptist minister. He moved to
    Hunt county in 1854.
  • and
    three other Hooker brothers also joined James and
    Thomas there.

German Hookers. Some Hookers in America
were of German
origin. Johann Hockertz came to America
with his family in 1846 and settled in Tippecanoe county, Indiana. Their son George Hooker fought in the Civil
War and had a difficult life afterwards.

“Never wealthy, he worked hard his entire life. He lost everything he had in a 100-year-flood
and had to file for bankruptcy. Despite
having filed for bankruptcy, he worked hard to pay back the debt so
that his
wife would have no shame in her small community. He
died poor in 1921 while checking his
fishing nets for food.”


New Zealand
. The Hooker and Vercoe
families left St. Just
in Cornwall on the Timandra in 1842
for a new life in New Zealand. They made
their home in New Plymouth, Taranaki and are among the longest
established
families there. John Hooker who came
there was a blacksmith, Henry and Nathaniel stone masons.
John Hooker, an Australian-based writer in
the 1970’s, was a descendant.

 

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Hooker Miscellany

Vowell and Hooker in Devon.  The surname Vowell in this case may have been Welsh
in origin, a contraction of the Welsh patronymic ap Howell
(son of Howell), although a much less common contraction than
Powell.

There were the Vowells or
Fowells who date from the early 1400’s at Fowelscombe near Ugborough in
Devon.  Frequent MP’s for Totnes, this
family remained at Fowelscombe until the 1750’s.

Unrelated was the Hooker alias Vowell family
of Exeter.  The male line was originally
Vowell from Pembrokeshire, dating back to around 1400.
Jago Vowell married Alice Hooker sometime in
the 1450’s.

“The
Hooker heiress, the last of her line, married into this Vowell line. To
honor
her father the Vowell male took the name of Hooker. So from the 1500s
onwards
they were known by both names but then finally by Hooker.”

The Hooker father was Sir
Richard Hooker, said to have been from Hurst castle in Hampshire.  He is more likely to have come from
Cambridgeshire in East Anglia.

Robert
Hooker alias Vowell, born in 1466, was the first in the family in
Exeter to
distinguish himself.  Born as the
youngest in a family of twenty children, he had been constrained to
begin his
career as the ‘register’ or registrar of Barnstaple.
But the catastrophic mortality which carried
off every one of his brothers and sisters left him as the sole heir.  He became mayor of Exeter in 1529 and its MP
in 1534.  He died three years later from
an outbreak of the plague in Exeter.

The Will of Thomas Hooker of Blaston, Leicestershire.  September 1559.  I Thomas Hooker of Blaston in the county of
Leicester, yeoman, do ordain and make this my testament and last will.  My body is to be buried where it shall please
my executrix.

I will as follows – to the
mother church of Lincoln, 8d; reparations of the chapel of St. Giles in
Blaston; 3s 4d.to Cicely my wife all my household stuff in the hall,
parlor, chambers
and kitchen, excepting one featherbed which I do give unto Agnes
Bellamy my
daughter.

The residue of my goods I will shall be divided into
three
parts.  I give the first part unto Cicely
my wife, the second part unto Kenelyn Hooker my son, and the third part
to
bring my body honestly to the ground and to pay my debts and legacies.

Plus: to
Robert Howlett dwelling in London, 6 pounds 13 shillings and 4 pence;
to Agnes
Bellamy my daughter, 10 pounds; to the children of Richard Bellamy and
Agues my
daughter, 10 pounds; Cicely my wife to have the custody of the same
till the
sons come to the age of eighteen and the daughters to the age of
seventeen; to
the children of John and Johan Watson of Carlton, 20s. apiece; and to
every of
my godchildren a ewe and a lamb.

And: Reparations of the town of Blaston, that is
to say towards the mending of the causey in the town, 3s. 4d; and
another 3s.
4d. to be bestowed where the inhabitants think most convenient; to servant Simon Halley a bay filly one year
old; and to everyone of my other servants, 12d.

I ordain Cicely Hooker my wife as my sole executrix and
Kenelyn Digby,
Edward Ireland and Sir William Clarke as supervisors.

Sir William Hooker, Lord Mayor of London.  William Hooker had been born in 1612, the son of William
Hooker of Berkhamstead
in Hertfordshire. He made his mark as a grocer in London.

He was nominated as the Alderman of Wallbrook
Ward in 1664 and of Cornhill Ward in 1668.
He had been knighted in 1666 and was to become the Lord Mayor of
London
in 1673.  He was President of the Guild
of Master Grocers from 1679 to 1680, and President of St Thomas’
Hospital from 1683
to 1688.

Sir William had come to
Greenwich from London in 1665 to escape the plague. The house he bought
at
Greenwich had been one of the chief properties of St Peter’s Abbey at
Ghent. It
was The Grange in Crooms Hill
and he lived there in considerable style with
his wife, son and three daughters.  His
armorial shield – that of a square shield with four shells – could be
found on
the outside of the gazebo which he built on the land.

He was there until his death in 1697 (after
which his son, William jr, continued in residence until 1713) and was
buried in
his vault at St Alfage.  A handsome
monument was placed in the south aisle in white marble surmounted by a
figure
dressed in alderman’s robes.  His portrait showed him wearing the
robes and
chain of office of a Lord Mayor of London.

Joseph Hooker and Charles Darwin.  Joseph Dalton Hooker, second son of Sir William Hooker,
was born at Halesworth in Suffolk in 1817.
He attended high school and university in Glasgow and qualified
there as
a doctor of medicine in 1839.

The same
year came a remarkable opportunity when, no doubt through the influence
of his
father, he enrolled on the Erebus under Captain James
Ross,
nominally as a surgeon but in reality as a botanist, to explore
Antarctica.  They would also visit
Australia, New Zealand and the Falklands.
While in Antarctica the Ross ice barrier and Mount Erebus were
named,
and on the expedition’s return in 1843 Hooker published his botanical
findings.

A second expedition followed to India, where
he spent two years trekking in the Himalayas and Sikkim, climbing to
over
19,000 feet and sending home the first rhododendrons.
In Sikkim he and his colleague succeeded in
annoying the elderly raja by crossing the country’s borders into Tibet
despite
an injunction not to do so.  As a result
they were arrested and imprisoned in 1849.
The British Government secured their release within a few weeks
by
threatening to invade Sikkim.

He was by now a close
friend of Charles Darwin, with whom he corresponded regularly.  Hooker later said:

“I believe I was the
first to whom he communicated his then new ideas on the subject of
evolution.”

In 1855 he was appointed assistant director to his father
at
Kew Gardens and Darwin wrote to congratulate him “though the income is
but
a poor one.”

After the death of Sir William in 1865 Joseph succeeded
to the
directorship.  In 1873 he was elected
President of the Royal Society.  He was
knighted in 1877 and, after retiring from Kew in 1885, spent twelve
years
publishing his magnum opus, The Flora of India, in seven
volumes.  He died in 1911, aged
ninety-four and was buried near his father in Kew churchyard.

Thomas Hooker’s Baptist Conversion.  Thomas Hooker, who had been born
in Tennessee in 1821, had only limited advantages for obtaining an
education
due to the death of his father when Thomas was ten.
He remained in Tennessee until he was
nineteen and then departed for Mississippi.

While clerking at Rome he was a leader of a gang of young men, owned
two
racehorses, lived fast and gambled.  On
one occasion, after some days and nights of carousing, he awoke to the
realization of the life he was leading, the thought of his early home
influence
and Christian parents came to him, and he turned away in disgust from
the
dissipations that had so fascinated him.
He disposed of his liquors and sold his racehorses and shortly
afterward
was converted and joined the Missionary Baptist Church.

His companions in vice left him and he sought
other and better company.  Soon he began
in a feeble way to preach the gospel of salvation.
He preached at intervals while he was engaged
in farming in Mississippi.  In the end he
was a Baptist minister for fifty four years.

Henry C. Hooker and the Sierra Bonita Ranch.  Henry Clay Hooker moved
west as a young man in the 1840’s.  After
working for the Indian Department in Kansas and at a mine in
California, he
began trading livestock when he herded 500 turkeys between California
and
Nevada.

In 1867 he received a contract
with the US Government which made him the leading beef supplier to
American
troops in the Arizona territory.  As he
drove his cattle through the Sulphur Valley that year, he was so
impressed by
the rich land that he saw that he decided to settle there.

The Sierra Bonita
Ranch, set up in 1872 on the ruins of an 18th century Spanish estate,
was the
first permanent cattle ranch in Arizona.
At its peak it amounted to some 250,000 acres and held up to
30,000 head
of cattle.  The ranch became famous for
Hooker’s hospitality.

In March 1882 Hooker allowed Wyatt Earp and his posse to
rest at the ranch during their escape from the Arizona authorities.  He even agreed to speak to the Governor of
their behalf.  Conchise county sheriff
Johnny Behan stopped at the ranch during his hunt for Earp, but Hooker
refused
to help him.  Charlton Heston played
Hooker in the movie Tombstone which
covered these events.

Hooker’s
descendants still occupy their ancestor’s original adobe house.

 

Select
Hooker Names

  • Richard Hooker, known as “the Judicious,” was an influential Anglican theologian of the late 1500’s. 
  • Thomas Hooker was a prominent Puritan in early New England, known today as “the father of Connecticut.” He was
    one of the great preachers of his time. 
  • Sir Joseph Hooker was a noted British
    botanist and explorer of the 19th century. 
  • LJ Hooker, born Tingyou of Chinese
    heritage, built up the largest real estate company in Australia after World War Two. 
  • John Lee Hooker was a well-known American blues singer, songwriter, and guitarist from Mississippi


Select Hooker Numbers Today

  • 4,000 in the UK (most numerous
    in London)
  • 6,000 in America (most numerous in Texas)
  • 2,000 elsewhere (most numerous in New Zealand)

 

Select Hooker and Like Surnames   

The various medieval trades and occupations were a source of surnames as John the baker would over time would become known as John Baker.  Some skilled craftsmen – such as chandlers, fletchers and turners – were able to form guilds, protective organizations, and style themselves Worshipful Companies.  These are some of the occupational surnames that you can check out.

BakerCookPotterTaylor
CarterCooperSawyerTurner
ChapmanFletcherShepherdWalker
ClarkMasonSkinnerWebster
ColemanMillerSmithWright

 

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